Pub history updates, mostly London and old

I am slowly moving my main blog content to this site. Its not a perfect blog, but I talk randomly about what is new on the pub history sites.

Incidentally, I am about to upgrade the server, double memory and double space, so more room for everything, and faster.

I have been adding more of the London 1836 Pigots directory, and also the Holdens 1811 directory, both just pub listings, and victuallers, coffee houses, publicans etc etc. These are all available at my London pub history page.

I seem to have a couple of entries in google for London street directory in the top ten now. I am not surprised, as my sites are good, and I spend a lot of time on them. The beauty of the London19 site which is another site of mine is that I can browse early street directories in London, particularly in 1832 and 1842; I am not madly interested in modern pubs. I am also slowly adding parts of the 1940 street directory for the whole of London, but this will take many years! I do have a listing of all the pubs in 2017, although I am certain this is missing a lot.

As my server is about to double in size, I may also expand the content to a few more regions / counties. I will decide, but they will be fairly basic entries for whatever area I choose.

London pub history

I think I can safely say that I have the best London pub history site which exists, and for that manner, probably for many parts of the UK, particularly in the South, and around London.

What I cannot claim is to be the most interesting, as many of the pages are only pertinent to those who have a specific interest in a pub, where their family may have run the public house, tavern , inn, hotel, or whatever it may have been.

My pages are also quite boring, I admit this. They are generally snap shots in time, with a small facet of detail. I could write a page about a specific public house, but i lack the confidence to know that what I am writing is correct; whilst many other sites just mention a brief description of a pubs history, and this is OK.

Other sites, particularly the newspaper sites, write some incredibly bold statements about a particular public house being the oldest ever, with little reference to their sources. I do provide sources. You make your choice as to this being correct. In fact, most of my sources are checkable.

Most of the emails I get are specifically related to minor details of people names being incorrect. Very few people, with some major exceptions, actually offer any groundbreaking additions to to the sites.

So, where do we go from here?

The simple answer is that I do not know. I occasionally write a longer article about a specific pub, but as there are many thousands of these, it gets lost in the updates.

Perhaps I could only list a handful of pubs, like a newspaper report, this is not really an option. Or maybe, I continue as before, being a boring site of facts and figures, and continue to list pubs as I see them. They open, they close, get demolished, become other types of buildings, etc etc.

What I will do is to continue to build on a street directory of London, and slowly add useful detail to this.

I do have three separate websites in the top fifteen for pub history search in google. These are my main site pubshistory.com, the pubhistory.co.uk site and deadpubs, the good old deadpubs site never fails to fill a gap.

I also have other sites, lots of them!

The pub history in the UK, not always London

This is my first blog on this site – the London17 blog. What can we post about London? Nothing useful, but I have been busy on another site, the Northern & Midlands pub history site.

I received a request for some clarity on researching somebody in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire. They also added some detail about the White Bear, in Cockpit, Mansfield. Cockpit was renamed Albert street around 1850, or thereabouts.

So, as I do, I added a whole host of updates for Mansfield pub history, and some additional research on the White Bear, the Old white Bear, and all the other pubs. This research is complete at present, but I still need to add some of my research and therefore this is still ongoing.

Here is Mansfield in 1911 which answers many questions.

That’s it really.

Kevan